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Single Transaction per Request ASP.NET CORE with EntityFramework

Updated: Mar 18, 2023

When developing web applications, it is important to ensure that all database transactions are handled in a consistent and efficient manner. One approach to achieving this is to use a single transaction per request when working with Entity Framework in ASP.NET Core. In this article, we will explore what a single transaction per request is, why it is important, and how to implement it using Entity Framework in ASP.NET Core.


What is a Single Transaction per Request?

A single transaction per request is an approach to handling database transactions that ensures that all database operations performed during a single HTTP request are treated as part of a single database transaction. This means that if any of the database operations fail, the entire transaction is rolled back, ensuring that the database remains in a consistent state.


Why is a Single Transaction per Request Important?

Using a single transaction per request has several benefits:

  1. Consistency: By using a single transaction per request, all database operations are performed as part of a single transaction. This ensures that the database remains in a consistent state even if there are errors during the request.

  2. Performance: Using a single transaction per request can improve the performance of your application by reducing the number of round-trips to the database.

  3. Atomicity: By treating all database operations as part of a single transaction, you can ensure that either all or none of the changes are committed to the database. This helps maintain data integrity and prevent inconsistencies.

How to Implement a Single Transaction per Request with Entity Framework

Implementing a single transaction per request with Entity Framework in ASP.NET Core is relatively straightforward. Here are the steps you need to follow:


STEP 1: Add the Microsoft.EntityFrameworkCore package to your project.


STEP 2: Create a DbContext instance for your database. This is typically done by creating a class that inherits from DbContext.


STEP 3: In your Startup.cs file, add the following code to configure the DbContext:

services.AddDbContext<MyDbContext>(options =>
    options.UseSqlServer(Configuration.GetConnectionString("MyDbConnection")));

This code tells ASP.NET Core to use Entity Framework to manage the database connections and transactions.


STEP 4: In your Controller class, add the following code to create a transaction for each HTTP request:

private readonly MyDbContext _dbContext;

public MyController(MyDbContext dbContext)
{
    _dbContext = dbContext;
}

[HttpPost]
public async Task<IActionResult> CreateMyEntity([FromBody] MyEntity entity)
{
    using (var transaction = await _dbContext.Database.BeginTransactionAsync())
    {
        try
        {
            // Perform database operations here

            _dbContext.SaveChanges();
            await transaction.CommitAsync();
            return Ok();
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            await transaction.RollbackAsync();
            return BadRequest(ex.Message);
        }
    }
}

In this code, we create a transaction using the BeginTransactionAsync method of the Database property of the DbContext. We then perform our database operations and commit the transaction if all operations are successful. If an exception occurs, we roll back the transaction to ensure that the database remains in a consistent state.


Conclusion

In this article, we have explored the benefits of using a single transaction per request when working with Entity Framework in ASP.NET Core. By using a single transaction per request, we can ensure that our database operations are performed in a consistent and efficient manner, improving the performance and maintainability of our applications. By following the steps outlined in this article, you can easily implement a single transaction per request in your own ASP.NET Core applications.

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