Diane Francis: Treating aging like a disease is the next big thing for science

New tools are accelerating the development of new, tailor-made medicines at a fraction of today’s costs

“Aging is a disease, and that disease is treatable,” says David Sinclair, professor of genetics at the Harvard Medical School.


LOS ANGELES — Extending everyone’s life in a healthy fashion is one of many goals held by Peter Diamandis, a space, technology, aeronautics and medicine pioneer. But the new field known as “longevity” is of interest to everyone.


“One hundred will be the new 60,” he told his Abundance360 conference recently. “The average human health span will increase by 10+ years this decade.”


He, like others in Silicon Valley, believe that aging is a “disease” and the result of “planned obsolescence,” or the wearing down of, or damage to, certain critical mechanisms, sensors and functions within our bodies. Longevity research is about identifying the core problems to mitigate or reverse them.


"The average human health span will increase

by 10+ years this decade" Peter Diamandis