top of page

Explain Azure Blob Storage

Updated: Jan 19, 2023

In this article, we will discuss Azure Blob Storage which includes working, types, advantages, and disadvantages.


So let's begin with the definition of Azure Blob Storage.


What is Azure Blob Storage?

Azure Blob Storage is a fully managed object storage service provided by Microsoft Azure. It is used to store unstructured data such as images, videos, audio, documents, and backups. The data is stored in the form of binary large objects (BLOBs), which can be accessed via a RESTful API or using Azure Storage client libraries.


Blob storage is designed to store large amounts of unstructured data, and can handle large amounts of data at a time. The service is highly scalable and can store petabytes of data. It is also highly available, meaning that data is automatically replicated across multiple data centers to ensure that it is always available.


Azure Blob storage also provides built-in security features, like role-based access control, encryption, and secure transfer, to protect data at rest and in transit. It is commonly used for storing backups, storing files for distributed systems, and as a source for big data analytics.


Types of Azure Blob Storage

Blob storage is divided into three types:

  1. Block Blobs: Used for streaming and storing large files, like video and audio files.

  2. Page Blobs: Used for random read/write operations, like virtual hard drives.

  3. Append Blobs: similar to block blobs, but optimized for append operations, like logging.



Block Blobs

This is the easiest and cheap way to store a file. When you store a file in Blob Storage as Block Blob, it will arrive in small parts. When the upload is complete, the file will merge and will be in one piece. Here you cannot modify the file until the reload is complete.


Append Blobs

When you want to modify a file or perform input/output operations then the Append blob is used. Page blob stores a file in a structural way and the user can upload parts of files from the end.


Page Blobs

A Page Blob is a type of blob that is optimized for random read/write operations, similar to a virtual hard drive. Page blobs are typically used to store virtual hard disk (VHD) files for Azure Virtual Machines, but can also be used for other types of files that require random read/write access.


Blob Storage Architecture:

Azure Blob Storage is based on a distributed architecture, where data is stored across multiple servers and data centers. The architecture is designed to provide high availability, durability, and scalability for storing large amounts of unstructured data.


The main components of the Azure Blob Storage architecture are:

  1. Storage Account: A storage account is a top-level container for all the data stored in Azure Blob Storage. It acts as a logical boundary for data and provides a unique namespace for all the data stored within it. Each storage account can contain multiple containers and each container can contain multiple blobs.

  2. Containers: A container is a logical grouping of blobs, similar to a directory in a file system. Each container has a unique name and can contain an unlimited number of blobs. Containers can also be configured with metadata and access control policies.

  3. Blobs: A blob is a binary large object that can be any type of file, including text, images, videos, and audio. Each blob has a unique URL, called a blob URI, that can be used to access it. Blobs can also be configured with metadata and access control policies.

  4. Data Nodes: Data nodes are the servers that store the actual data. Each data node is responsible for storing a set of blocks, and each block is stored on a different data node. Data nodes are distributed across multiple data centers and are responsible for replicating and maintaining the data.

  5. Metadata Nodes: Metadata nodes are responsible for maintaining the metadata for the blobs and containers. They keep track of the location of the data nodes and the status of the data.

  6. Front-End Nodes: front-end nodes are responsible for handling incoming requests and forwarding them to the appropriate data and metadata nodes. They also handle authentication and authorization for the requests.

The architecture is designed to automatically replicate and distribute data across multiple data centers for high availability and durability. The data is split into blocks and each block is stored on a different server, so if one server goes down, the data can still be accessed from another server. Additionally, built-in security features, like role-based access control and encryption, are provided to secure the data at rest and in transit.


Azure Blob Storage works by creating a storage account in Azure and then creating containers within that storage account to hold the blobs. A container acts as a logical grouping of blobs, similar to a directory in a file system.



Once a container is created, you can then upload, download, and manage blobs within that container. Blobs can be any type of file, including text, images, videos, and audio. Each blob has a unique URL, called a blob URI, that can be used to access it.


When you upload a blob to Azure Blob Storage, it is automatically replicated across multiple data centers for high availability and durability. The data is split into blocks and each block is stored on a different server, so if one server goes down, the data can still be accessed from another server.


Advantages of Blob Storage:

  1. Scalability: Azure Blob Storage is designed to scale to handle large amounts of data, making it well-suited for storing backups, and files for distributed systems, and as a source for big data analytics.

  2. Durability: Azure Blob Storage automatically replicates data across multiple data centers for high availability and durability. It also supports different levels of redundancy, such as locally redundant storage, zone-redundant storage, and geo-redundant storage, to ensure that data is protected in the event of a failure.

  3. Accessibility: Azure Blob Storage provides a RESTful API and client libraries for different programming languages, making it easy to access and manage data from any application.

  4. Security: Azure Blob Storage provides built-in security features, such as role-based access control, encryption, and secure transfer, to protect data at rest and in transit.

  5. Cost-effective: Azure Blob Storage is a cost-effective solution for storing large amounts of unstructured data in the cloud. It allows you to store data without having to invest in expensive hardware and infrastructure.

Disadvantages of Blob Storage:

  1. Data structure: Azure Blob Storage is designed for unstructured data and does not support complex data structures such as relational databases.

  2. Data processing: Azure Blob Storage is primarily used for storing data and does not provide built-in tools for data processing and analysis.

  3. Search capabilities: Azure Blob Storage does not provide built-in search capabilities, which can make it difficult to find specific files or data.

  4. Access control: While Azure Blob Storage provides basic access control, it may not be suitable for scenarios that require more advanced access control capabilities.

  5. Real-time access: Azure Blob Storage is not designed for real-time access to data, which can make it less suitable for some types of applications.



The Tech Platform

Recent Posts

See All
bottom of page