10 surprising things that rely on artificial intelligence


  • Artificial intelligence (AI) played a key role in developing COVID-19 vaccines.

  • But you may not realize how many day-to-day things rely on it.

  • From filtering out spam emails to helping trains run on time, AI is all around us.

Artificial intelligence (AI) has transformed many aspects of our lives for the better. It even played a role in developing vaccines against COVID-19. But you may be surprised just how many things we take for granted that rely on AI.


As IBM explain, "at its simplest form, artificial intelligence is a field, which combines computer science and robust datasets to enable problem-solving." It includes the sub-fields of machine learning and deep learning. These two fields use algorithms that are designed to make predictions or classifications based on input data.

This is how AI is used in our everyday lives.

Of course, as technology becomes more sophisticated, literally millions of decisions need to be made every day and AI speeds things up and takes the burden off humans. The World Economic Forum describes AI as a key driver of the Fourth Industrial Revolution.

Forecasted shipments of edge artificial intelligence (AI) chips worldwide in 2020 and 2024, by device. Image: Statista


The Forum’s platform, Shaping the Future of Technology Governance: Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning, is bringing together key stakeholders to design and test policy frameworks that accelerate the benefits and mitigate the risks of AI and machine learning.


Here are 10 examples of AI we encounter every day.


1. Emails

Your email provider almost certainly uses AI algorithms to filter mail into your spam folder. Quite helpful when you consider that 77% of global email traffic is spam. Google says less than 0.1% of spam makes it past its AI-powered filters.


Email marketers use AI to track who opens mail when, and how they respond. Google’s AI tools read documents in Cloud storage in order to present the most relevant material to users.


But there are concerns that algorithms that read content to target advertising are invading our privacy.

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